LANCIA TREVI VOLUMEX

For collectors only

YEAR: 1984

Experts will recognise one. Behind the appearance of an old-fashioned saloon hides an icon of technical excellence rediscovered by Abarth in competitions, and marketed by Lancia in the early Eighties. The letters “VX” on the grille stand for “Volumex”, the first volumetric compressor mounted on a production car. 135 hp and astounding running smoothness.

Historical background

The first in the world

No, the Roman fountain has nothing to do with its name: “Tre-vi” actually means “three volumes” (three-box). Created as an extension of the Beta project, with a particular aim at export sales and a sober clientele, the Beta Trevi was presented at the Turin Auto Show in April 1980. Developed from the two-box Beta, it shared the same platform and engines: the 1.6, the carburetted 2.0, and the 2.0 i.e. The back was completely redesigned, and perfectly connected with the lines of the front, resulting in a balanced profile. The innovative “Swiss cheese” dashboard, not quite popular at first, became with time the distinctive sign of a spacious and well-defined interior.
On the same stand, two years later on 21st April 1982, Lancia introduced the “Beta Trevi VX Volumex”, the first production car ever with a volumetric compressor. Next to it were the Delta Turbo 4×4 and the Rally (037). A “supercharged” exhibition that reflected a carmaker always looking for technical solutions for both race and road cars.
The rotary-lobe compressor had long been put aside by the automotive industry (its first appearance dates back to 1919,) but Lancia decided to revisit the idea and produce it in series for the three-box Beta (as well as the coupé and the HPE), which was offered from the beginning with Ermenegildo Zegna upholstery—a Piedmontese partnership of the highest profile.
In 1983 the model was updated and even lost the name “Beta”, as if to make it independent from the rest of the range. Gone was the matte grey band in the rear, replaced by the more modern-looking lettering. New air intakes were designed for the rear pillars, and the ratios of gear and axle were lengthened to optimise consumption. The price of 17,052.00 liras was well-calibrated compared to the other saloons in the medium-high tier the Trevi belonged to. However, the internal competition with the Prisma (1982) did not benefit sales. After two years of production, the Trevi Volumex was retired in 1984. A little over 3,800 vehicles were made, making it quite the rare item.

Technical specifications

  • BODY STYLE: 4-door saloon
  • SEATS: 5
  • LENGTH: 436 cm
  • WIDTH: 171 cm
  • HEIGHT: 140 cm
  • WEIGHT: 1,195 kg
  • ENGINE: Supercharged 4-cylinder
  • DRIVETRAIN: FWD
  • DISPLACEMENT: 1,995 cc
  • POWER OUTPUT: 135 hp
  • FUEL TYPE: Petrol
  • TRANSMISSION: 5-speed manual
  • SPEED: 190 km/h
  • REGISTRATION YEAR: 1984

Driving experience – Not like the others

A true example of understatement applied to the automotive world. Today, the Trevi Volumex is vintage car that is taking back the role it is owed: that of a balanced saloon with unparalleled technical excellence and just a few stylistic quirks, such as the front spoiler. A detail worth mentioning is the hint of spoiler above the rear window, present in all the engine options for aerodynamic reasons, that enhances the profile of the car. The interior welcomes its passengers with wide, well-contoured seats upholstered in Zegna wool that almost look like comfortable living room armchairs. The dashboard continues onto the door panels, embracing the driver and passengers, and its peculiar design makes the environment even more sophisticated.
On the road, its strengths are its balanced setup and the engine’s progressive power delivery. Compared to a turbocharger, the volumetric compressor lacks the turbo lag (the true Achilles’ heel of the supercharged vehicles of the time), and has a steady power delivery never seen before 1984. 135 hp is only 13 more than the naturally aspirated 2.0 i.e., but the torque curve is completely different and lends the saloon a unique driving flexibility, unrivalled outside of higher displacement cars. For this reason, the magazine Quattroruote gave the test VX 5 stars for engine and pickup, as well as brakes—disc brakes on all four wheels—transmission, and steering. These traits highlight the chassis’s qualities, really well-balanced and equipped with independent suspensions. The result is a vehicle easy to drive, fast, entertaining on twisty roads and safe even on wet asphalt. A prestigious collectible car packed with technology, and whose value can only increase.

Passione Classica’s Lancia Trevi Volumex

The sticker on the rear window is still the original from the official dealership that delivered it in 1984, and reveals that this Trevi Volumex, the second in our collection, comes from the Abruzzo region. Of the 3,800 vehicles produced, it’s easy to figure out very few remain. Most of them were scrapped—either cars turned into wrecks by time, or still-functioning vehicles sacrificed to the numerous national scrappage schemes. That’s why finding a Trevi Volumex today is far from easy, especially such a well-preserved model like this one, sporting an elegant metallic light blue coat (code 415) and an exclusive Ermenegildo Zegna interior. The seats received a professional treatment with specific products to protect the wool fibres.
Full service and invoices of all interventions available. It comes with double keys.

Driving experience – Not like the others

A true example of understatement applied to the automotive world. Today, the Trevi Volumex is vintage car that is taking back the role it is owed: that of a balanced saloon with unparalleled technical excellence and just a few stylistic quirks, such as the front spoiler. A detail worth mentioning is the hint of spoiler above the rear window, present in all the engine options for aerodynamic reasons, that enhances the profile of the car. The interior welcomes its passengers with wide, well-contoured seats upholstered in Zegna wool that almost look like comfortable living room armchairs. The dashboard continues onto the door panels, embracing the driver and passengers, and its peculiar design makes the environment even more sophisticated.
On the road, its strengths are its balanced setup and the engine’s progressive power delivery. Compared to a turbocharger, the volumetric compressor lacks the turbo lag (the true Achilles’ heel of the supercharged vehicles of the time), and has a steady power delivery never seen before 1984. 135 hp is only 13 more than the naturally aspirated 2.0 i.e., but the torque curve is completely different and lends the saloon a unique driving flexibility, unrivalled outside of higher displacement cars. For this reason, the magazine Quattroruote gave the test VX 5 stars for engine and pickup, as well as brakes—disc brakes on all four wheels—transmission, and steering. These traits highlight the chassis’s qualities, really well-balanced and equipped with independent suspensions. The result is a vehicle easy to drive, fast, entertaining on twisty roads and safe even on wet asphalt. A prestigious collectible car packed with technology, and whose value can only increase.

Passione Classica’s Lancia Trevi Volumex

The sticker on the rear window is still the original from the official dealership that delivered it in 1984, and reveals that this Trevi Volumex, the second in our collection, comes from the Abruzzo region. Of the 3,800 vehicles produced, it’s easy to figure out very few remain. Most of them were scrapped—either cars turned into wrecks by time, or still-functioning vehicles sacrificed to the numerous national scrappage schemes. That’s why finding a Trevi Volumex today is far from easy, especially such a well-preserved model like this one, sporting an elegant metallic light blue coat (code 415) and an exclusive Ermenegildo Zegna interior. The seats received a professional treatment with specific products to protect the wool fibres.
Full service and invoices of all interventions available. It comes with double keys.

The interior welcomes its passengers with wide, well-contoured seats upholstered in Zegna wool that almost look like comfortable living room armchairs, while the dashboard’s peculiar design makes the environment even more sophisticated.

Price

€ 17.900,00

``Vota la Voce`` - The soundtrack

It’s 1984, September. As this Trevi Volumex leaves the dealership, on TV it’s the moment of “Vota la Voce”, the music show now on its twelfth edition and hosted by Claudio Cecchetto and Isabella Ferrari. Amongst the international guests we find Talk Talk, one of the most influential groups on the pop scene that a few months ago released their second album: “It’s My Life”. After the first successful single with the same name, it’s the turn of “Such a Shame”, inspired by the book “The Dice Man”. The lyrics are about an odd man who takes the most important decision of his life based on the casting of a dice.
In the video Mark Hollis, frontman of the group endowed with an unmistakable voice, often described as a boisterous and dynamic artist, shows off his facial mimicry, mirror of an artistic line that produces radio hits with melancholic and deep lyrics.

Introduction

Directly from the historical archive, an interesting video introducing the Trevi Volumex.

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